Adventures in Vermicomposting

Worm poop.  Pretty powerful stuff.  It does all kinds of amazing things for the garden. Most gardeners are happy to find an earthworm wiggling through their soil.  It indicates that the garden is healthy, and people who push the dirt know that those worms are leaving fertilizer in their wake.  But an earthworm or two can’t do enough to thrill me.  I need more – more clumps of wonderful, friable soil in which to play – bigger, greener plants to tend.

I am also a total sucker for gadgets that are demonstrated at the fair. Yes, I have orange cleaner, weirdly shaped mops, piles of brightly colored chamois’, and more than my share of shiny knives – all sold by charming, silken-voiced men from behind counter-tops littered with leaflets and accessories.

I know…they almost never work.  A similarly afflicted former co-worker once destroyed the floor of our staff lounge while demonstrating the wonders of a mop that would remove ANY substance from carpeting. She recreated the fair demo by pouring fresh coffee onto the carpet, and proceeded to neatly work it into every fiber over a 4 foot square with the miracle cloth she had just purchased.  Our boss had the stained carpet replaced a couple of months – and several steam cleanings – later. Oops!

Still, when I rounded the corner of the building housing all the demos, and spied the tower of green trays I was hooked. What new garden wonder was this?  Ah!  The Worm Factory 360.  Four trays, a lid, and the potential to quickly create rich compost full of worm castings.  SOLD!

Worm Factory 360 – a thing of beauty!

I brought the giant box home, unpacked it and began to read the instructions.  The salesman had let me know that one tiny element was missing from the setup – worms.  The composter comes without the key ingredient, so I did an online search and purchased 2,000 Red Wigglers from Uncle Jim’s Worm Farm.

A sack full of wriggling workers.

I waited a week or so, hoping that the worms would not be left on my doorstep on the hottest day of the year – frying on my steps before I could rescue them.  I have a good UPS guy though – he rings the bell and runs, but only after placing packages in a shady corner.  Honestly, I have never answered my door covered in chicken poop, said anything inappropriate, or threatened him in any way.  NO idea why the running, but, oh well.

I took the sack – which moved in a way that creeped out the 8 year old, and simultaneously fascinated and repelled me – out to the waiting tower of trays. The print instructions read like a rocket manual (too bad I had misplaced the DVD.  I found it later and it is MUCH simpler and more to the point – sigh) but I managed to get the suggested materials arranged to form a nice worm bed.

The instructions indicated that the worms should be left in a pile, rather than spread through the bed.  Dump one sack of worms – check! The manual also hinted that our newest pets might be inclined to, er, slink away and that they should be kept under a light with the lid on for three days or so, presumably until they had decided that we measure up as a host family and um, dug in for good.

I checked them once or twice – an hour – for the first day or so.  Too much fun to see what they were doing and they did tend to slither up to the corners of the lid and then fall onto the table in clumps.  I scooped them up and put them back a couple of times, rearranged the bedding material, and finally convinced them that a ready supply of food would be theirs for the taking should they be inclined to stay.

After about a week I had my first shock. We have chickens.  Chickens attract flies – no matter how often and how well I clean (scrupulously, thank you very much) there will be flies when one keeps farm animals.  Such is life.  What I didn’t figure on was that the flies had found a way into the worm bin and laid eggs.  Yup, I had to work to keep my breakfast down the morning I uncovered the worm tray to find it crawling with fat white maggots.  GAG!!!!!

There was a ready solution at hand however.  I mentioned we have chickens, right?  Chickens LOVE bugs.  And worms.  And, yes, maggots.  I donned some latex gloves and dug through the maturing compost material for a juicy specimen, offering it to the ladies.  MUNCH!  Gone was the maggot and Annie was a happy woman.  Did I love picking through semi-decomposed vegetables and worms to find maggots?  No. I did not. But… I filled an old dog bowl with snacks for the hens and everyone was happy.  It has been a couple of months and the maggots have not returned.

Now the Laughing Place is home to 3 humans, 2 dogs, 6 chickens, and 2,000 red wigglers. The worms may not sit up and beg (neither do the dogs for that matter) but they do one pretty fantastic trick – check out the compost!!

Worms doing their best to make some seriously good fertilizer!

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